Seats fill for films

April 12, 2007

A celebration of Vietnamese moviemaking is turning three, and organizers expect its biggest audiences yet.

Seats fill for films

Seats fill for films
ALL IN THE DELIVERY: Johnny Nguyen delivers a punishing kick to a villain in “The Rebel,” which makes its world premiere Thursday in Irvine at the third Vietnamese International Film Festival.

“THE REBEL”: Johnny Nguyen, left, and Ngo Thanh Van star in the movie, the third feature film from Buena Park resident Charlie Nguyen. The movie was a special accomplishment for Nguyen because of the troubles the cast and crew endured in Vietnam, he said.

Seats fill for films
READY FOR THE CROWDS: Actors Johnny Tri Nguyen and Ngo Thanh Van, movie director Charlie Nguyen and film festival co-director Ysa Le, from left. ANDY TEMPLETON, FOR THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

The Orange County Register

One of Charlie Nguyen’s big dreams is coming true this week.

The Buena Park resident’s feature film “The Rebel” is making its world premiere Thursday at the Vietnamese International Film Festival. It’s Nguyen’s third movie, and it’s also the third incarnation of the biennial film fest. By all accounts, the festival is getting larger and more influential each year.

The third Vietnamese International Film Festival, called “ViFF” by organizers and participants, runs Thursday through Sunday and April 19-22. Most films screen at UC Irvine’s Film and Video Center, with the opening movie at Edwards University in Irvine.

What started as a joint project between two area Vietnamese-American nonprofit organizations has become one of the nation’s largest gatherings for Vietnamese cinema and a launching pad for aspiring filmmakers.

“ViFF has always been our supporter from the very beginning,” said Nguyen, 39, who grew up in Orange County and graduated from Garden Grove High School.

“To make ‘The Rebel,’ we needed a lot of support from peers and friends, and ViFF was the portal through which all of our support came from. It’s sort of like a cradle for Vietnamese filmmakers in the community.”

The Vietnamese American Arts and Letters Association and the VietNamese Language and Culture organization at UCLA started the film festival in October 2003 by showing previously released films. It has grown into a popular gathering for the local Vietnamese community, with 51 films, social events and new movies making world and national premieres. About 5,000 attendees are anticipated this year.

“This is the biggest ever,” said Ysa Le, festival co-director. “There definitely has been growth. We see a younger generation of filmmakers with energy and new work. It’s a very diverse group.”

Opening picture “The Rebel” is a rare Vietnamese action and martial arts drama set in the 1920s. The film, in Vietnamese with English subtitles, was shot in Vietnam last year and stars Johnny Nguyen (Charlie’s younger brother), Ngo Thanh Van and Dustin Nguyen (no relation), whose first breakout role was in television’s “21 Jump Street.”

“I have been wanting to work in Vietnam,” said Dustin Nguyen, who plays the villain Sy – his first turn as an antagonist and his first acting job in Vietnamese. “It’s extremely important there are festivals to promote and encourage Vietnamese-American artists to make films. Otherwise, there’s really not an outlet to learn or see films.”

“The Rebel’s” cast and crew shot for 80 days in Vietnam, whose film industry is still playing catch-up with Hollywood’s and Hong Kong’s. They had to deal with a number of obstacles, including crew members who got sick, actors who got hurt and cultural police officers who monitored every move.

“We overcame a lot of difficulties,” Charlie Nguyen said. “There were tons of disasters and obstacles. It was a labor of love for a lot of people. So it’s something that we all feel very proud of.”

Other new films that have been attracting buzz include “Dust of Life,” “The White Silk Dress” and “Journey From the Fall,” a saga about re-education camps and refugees that had a national release last month.

“We’ve seen the success of ‘Journey from the Fall’ in the theaters,” Le said. “Vietnamese cinema is getting attention. Other films will follow and get the spotlight as well.”

And the filmmakers attending this festival are ready for their chance to shine.

Contact the writer: 714-796-6026 or rchang@ocregister.com

 

 
Actor Johnny Tri Nguyen (L) and actress Ngo Thanh Van in a scene of Dong mau anh hung (the Rebel)  

The Vietnamese International Film Festival 2007 (ViFF) is set to open in America from Apr. 12-22, reflecting the lives of Vietnamese around the world via the eyes of talented filmmakers.

The third biennial ViFF welcomes a record number of films this year – a total of 51, including 13 features submitted by filmmakers of Vietnamese descent from around the world.

ViFF 2007 will open with the world premiere of the visually stunning martial arts drama, The Rebel, directed by Charlie Nguyen on April 12 and close with the warm-hearted feature debut, Owl and the Sparrow, directed by Stephane Gauger on April 22.

The Spotlight Program on April 14 will showcase screenwriter, Nguyen Thi Minh Ngoc, whose work is featured in the film Song trong so hai (Living in Fear) directed by Bui Thac Chuyen.

Six made-in-Vietnam features, including Chuyen cua Pao (Pao’s story), Song trong so hai (Living in Fear), Hon Truong Ba da hang thit (Souls on swing), Hat mua roi bao lau (Bride of Silence), Ao lua Ha Dong (the White silk dress), and Dong mau anh hung (the Rebel) will be showcased at the festival.

Established in October 2003, ViFF aims to support and promote cinema by filmmakers of Vietnamese descent.

ViFF’s mission is to inspire future filmmakers and recognize existing ones as well as to provide a forum for the filmmakers to share their experiences with colleagues and audiences.

Organized by the non-profit Vietnamese-American Arts and Letters Association (VAALA) and the Vietnamese Language and Culture (VNLC) at University of California, Los Angeles, this year’s festival theme is Sharing Visions, echoing the need for Vietnamese cinema to extend its reach beyond the Vietnamese communities to the larger, global audience.

Screenings will be held mainly at University of California, Irvine (UCI)’s Film & Video Center with selected screening panel discussions at UCLA and in Westminster, California on two consecutive weekends from April 12-15 & 19-22. Opening Night will be held at the Edwards University Cinema 6, Irvine.


 

Actor Johnny Tri Nguyen (L) and actress Ngo Thanh Van in a scene of Dong Mau Anh Hung (the Rebel).

The Vietnamese International Film Festival 2007 (ViFF) is set to open in America from April 12-22, reflecting the lives of Vietnamese around the world via the eyes of talented filmmakers. 

The third biennial ViFF welcomes a record number of films this year – a total of 51, including 13 features submitted by filmmakers of Vietnamese descent from around the world.

ViFF 2007 will open with the world premiere of the visually stunning martial arts drama, The Rebel, directed by Charlie Nguyen on April 12 and close with the warm-hearted feature debut, Owl and the Sparrow, directed by Stephane Gauger on April 22.

The Spotlight Programme on April 14 will showcase screenwriter, Nguyen Thi Minh Ngoc, whose work is featured in the film ‘Song Trong So Hai’ (Living in Fear) directed by Bui Thac Chuyen.

Six made-in-Vietnam features, including ‘Chuyen cua Pao’ (Pao’s Story), ‘Song Trong So Hai’ (Living in Fear), ‘Hon Truong Ba Da Hang Thit’ (Souls on Swing), ‘Hat Mua Roi Bao Lau’ (Bride of Silence), ‘Ao Lua Ha Dong’ (The White Silk Dress), and ‘Dong Mau Anh Hung’ (The Rebel) will be showcased at the festival.

Established in October 2003, ViFF aims to support and promote cinema by filmmakers of Vietnamese descent.

ViFF’s mission is to inspire future filmmakers and recognise existing ones as well as to provide a forum for the filmmakers to share their experiences with colleagues and audiences.

Organised by the non-profit Vietnamese-American Arts and Letters Association (VAALA) and the Vietnamese Language and Culture (VNLC) at University of California, Los Angeles, this year’s festival theme is Sharing Visions, echoing the need for Vietnamese cinema to extend its reach beyond the Vietnamese communities to the larger, global audience.

Screenings will be held mainly at University of California, Irvine (UCI)’s Film & Video Centre with selected screening panel discussions at UCLA and in Westminster, California on two consecutive weekends from April 12-15 & 19-22. Opening Night will be held at the Edwards University Cinema 6, Irvine

(Thanh Nien)

 
16:48′ 05/12/2006 (GMT+7)
VietnamNetBridge – On the evening of November 30, Hai Yen flew to Estonia to be on the jury of the Tallinn Black Nights film festival.

Soạn: HA 975717 gi đến 996 để nhn ảnh này
 

The 24 year-old actress won a prize for acting from the Vietnam film association and a prize at the recent Asia film festival. She was the star of the movie “Chuyện của Pao” (Pao’s story), which has been shown in over 10 international film festivals including Fukuoka, Pusan, NHK and China Golden in 2006. The movie was one of the top five movies at the World Montreal film festival.

Hai Yen said that it was difficult for Vietnamese movies in general and Chuyện của Pao in particular to win prizes at top international festivals. Films made by other countries are of better quality as a result of capital investment and superior human resources.

Chuyen cua Pao has been shown at ten famous universities in America and will be presented in 12 more this December.

At the moment, Hai Yen and her film team have been preparing for Mùa Hè lạnh lẽo (Cold summer) – to be shot in January 2007.

(Source: TT&VH)

 

Actress Truong Ngoc Anh and director
Luu Huynh at Busan Film Festival.

Vietnamese film ‘Ao Lua Ha Dong’ (The White Silk Dress) won audience vote prize of the Busan International Film Festival.

The prize presentation ceremony was held on October 20 in Busan.

The film’s director Luu Huynh came on the stage to receive the prize.

The White Silk Dress, a five-year production with a value of over US$2 million is the most expensive film ever made in Vietnam, relates the misfortunes of its two central characters, Dan and her humpbacked husband, and their efforts to hold on to a precious Ha Dong silk dress that belonged to Dan’s mother.

The film was shot in Vietnam’s northern and central regions and one of its scenes needed recreating a flood.

The filmmakers had to blockade a village in Hoi An. A dam surrounding the village was set up using thousands of sand-bags and water was pumped in to give the impression of a flood. More than 1,000 extras were used for the evacuation scenes.

Ao Lua Ha Dong is the first Vietnamese film to use the ‘flying-cam’ technique, which was achieved by hiring American and Singaporean technicians.

At Cannes 2005, an extended trailer of Ao Lua Ha Dong impressed audiences with its beautiful scenes and unique Vietnamese style imagery.


 

In the film 'Bamboo Prosthesis' which won a prize at 28th Tokyo Video Festival.

Amateur Vietnamese video makers will be among the contestants at the 29th Tokyo Video Festival next year.

TVF has grown strongly to become the world’s biggest video festival with more than 40,000 entries from 87 countries and has introduced a number of high-grade videos to the world, each produced in the personal style special to this media.

Amateurs can submit their videos of less than 20 minutes on topics like family relations, social issues, education, culture and environment before the deadline of September 30.

The Tokyo Video Festival began in 1978 a quarter of a century ago by the Japanese-based JVC Corporation, a maker of electronic products, which has sought to popularise video.

The annual TVF is a world festival of citizens’ video where ordinary people can use a video camcorder to express their own ideas and opinions.

Vietnam began to participate in the TVF festival in 2004 with 17 entries.

Previous award winners from Vietnam have included Lam Thanh Quy for Con Di Tren Vet Tre Tron (Bamboo Prosthesis), Pham Viet Phuoc for Nha Tien Tri Ao (Imaginary Prophet) and To Hong Hai for Xin Dung De Mam Song Lui Tan (Please Do Not Let Live Seeds Perish).

Two Vietnamese documentaries by female directors took home excellence prizes at the 28th Tokyo Video Festival with film Vuot Doc (Overcome the Slope) by To Cam and Huong Hoa Giua Doi Thuong (the Scent of Normal Life) by Viet Oanh.

The organisers will award 500,000 yen (US$4,406) for the first prize, 400,000 yen ($3,524) for the second prizes and 100,000 yen ($850) for the third on February 2007 in Tokyo.

For more information, access the website at http://www.jvc.com.vn or contact 088 478 755. (VNS)

   04/29/2006 — 21:56(GMT+7)
 

Mexico (VNA) – Two Vietnamese films, "Mua Len Trau" (Buffalo Boy) and "Nguoi dan ba mong du" (Sleep-walking Woman), were screened at  the opening day of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) film festival in Mexico City on April 28.

Addressing the ceremony, Vietnamese Ambassador to Mexico Le Van Thinh expressed his belief that the festival will play a bridge role in deepening understanding of Mexican people about landscapes, people, culture and history of ASEAN countries in general and Viet Nam in particular.

The week-long event, co-hosted by Vietnamese, Indonesian, Malaysian, Filipino and Thai embassies in Mexico, will air a number of motion pictures of Southeast Asian countries, which features their cultural diversity.-Enditem.