04/16/2006 — 21:28(GMT+7)
 

Ha Noi (VNA) – An unique classical guitar concert by the duo EURASIA will be held at the Ha Noi Opera House on April 20 night to raise funds for Vietnamese Agent Orange (AO) victims.

The duo EURASIA brings together two internationally acclaimed classical guitarists, Josep Henriquez from Spain and Nguyen Thanh Hang from Viet Nam, each with own strong reputation and wealth of recording and performing experiences.

The two classical guitarists will be accompanied by the chamber orchestra of the Ha Noi Conservatory. 

The event will be broadcast live by the VTC digital television, and ticket sales from this concert will be donated to the poor and AO victims.

EURASIA was formed in 2003 and is highly regarded by critics as an exceptional duo creating genuine chamber music for two guitars. -Enditem

 
   

A Vietnamese blood bank website has recorded 120,000 hits since it was launched two months ago.

The Vietnamese language site, www.nganhangmau.com, contains information on the availability of blood at over 500 health care centers in Ho Chi Minh City.

Its designer, Nguyen Tran Huy Phong, 26, who is also director of a city-based web designing company, added visitors were now logging in to the site from nearly 40 countries and territories.

They could register online to receive or donate blood, he said.

“Being a bank, there must be those depositing and those withdrawing”, Phong said adding he hoped needy hospitals and individuals would take full advantage of the site.

It has so far has attracted 400 donors.

When non-profit Christina Noble Children's Foundation was looking for group B blood for a heart operation on four-year-old Nguyen Thi Hong Cam, the website sent it a list of donors.

Phong is now constructing an English language site, www.vietnambloodbank.com.

Source: Tuoi Tre – Translated by Hoang Bao

CTV Toronto

Sat. Apr. 15 2006 11:34 PM ET

The Vietnamese children were adopted by Canadian families.The Vietnamese children were adopted by Canadian families.

Children were carried by nurses or strapped into place with duct tape to keep them secure for the bumpy ride in a military cargo plane.Children were carried by nurses or strapped into place with duct tape to keep them secure for the bumpy ride in a military cargo plane.

“We were the last ones out of Saigon,” rescue mission organizer Victoria Leach said.  “There was a ring of fire around the city when we took off in that old Hercules aircraft.”“We were the last ones out of Saigon,” rescue mission organizer Victoria Leach said. “There was a ring of fire around the city when we took off in that old Hercules aircraft.”

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In the days before the fall of Saigon in April 1975, a group of orphans, most too young to know what was happening, were whisked away to new lives in Canada. On Saturday, the group reunited for the first time in Toronto.

On that April day, 57 orphans — mostly infants — were strapped into place with duct tape onboard a military Hercules cargo plane and flown away from a world of violence and destruction.

Their lives were saved mere days before the fall of Saigon and the departure of U.S. troops from Vietnam.

The children were adopted by Canadian families, changing everyone's lives.

"We wouldn't have wanted to miss him," William Campbell, who adopted her son Thanh, said. "He's been a great son."

More than 30 years have passed since the group was last together for only a few hours. But that trip left a lasting impression on all their lives, even if most cannot remember the flight.

Two of the rescued children worked to bring the children, their families and rescuers together for the first time.

They felt everyone should meet because, as adults, the rescued children struggle with questions about who they are and where they come from. Many do not even know some of the most basic personal information.

"There are days I think, 'How can you just not know … where you're from,'" Trent Kilner said. "How can you not know how old you are?"

Kilner helped organize the reunion. He said the rescue is part of their identities and the reunion provides them with some of the missing pieces in their lives.

The rescued children may not remember their flight from Vietnam, but their rescuers do. Their memories remain vivid three decades later.

"We were the last ones out of Saigon," rescue mission organizer Victoria Leach said. "There was a ring of fire around the city when we took off in that old Hercules aircraft."

The group hopes this weekend's reunion will build memories and forge lifelong relationships.

With a report from CTV Toronto's Galit Solomon