The Last Boat Out of Vietnam: (NO LONGER BEING CARRIED)

April 10, 2006

The Last Boat Out of Vietnam: An American Success Story The Triumph of a Vietnamese-American Family in their Adopted Homeland
 
 
 
The legacy of the Vietnam War continues to resonate here in the United States. The current War in Iraq has rekindled debate and discussion about Vietnam, as people share memories and make comparisons. The war was certainly very tragic for many American soldiers and their families, but we don’t often hear stories about the South Vietnamese and their struggles against the Vietcong. After all this time, misconceptions still exist in the United States about what really happened over there.(PRWEB) April 6, 2006 — The legacy of the Vietnam War continues to resonate here in the United States. The current War in Iraq has rekindled debate and discussion about Vietnam, as people share memories and make comparisons. The war was certainly very tragic for many American soldiers and their families, but we don’t often hear stories about the South Vietnamese and their struggles against the Vietcong. After all this time, misconceptions still exist in the United States about what really happened over there.

“What many Americans don’t know is how grateful people in South Vietnam are to the American soldiers for giving their lives and helping to defend their country,” says Kenny Truong, a survivor of the Vietnam War and member of a proud Vietnamese-American family. Truong’s epic family saga is detailed in The Last Boat Out: Memoirs of a Triumphant Vietnamese-American Family (GasLight Publishing, 2006).

The book follows the struggles his family went through in Vietnam and also their triumphant rise in the United States. When he was only six-months old, Kenny and his mother were seriously wounded by shrapnel during a firefight. They endured the constant threat of the Vietcong for years before finally getting on the “last boat out of Vietnam” and coming to America.

“My parents fought all odds and obstacles, and they were determined to bring us to the United States,” says Truong. “I learned from Mom that we will never give up and we will never take no for a simple answer.” The book was written by Kenny’s parents and translated to English by him and his wife, Ton-Nu Phuong-Thao.

It’s the story of the family’s triumph over incredible adversity and the gratitude they feel toward the American soldiers and sailors who helped in their losing battle, toward the soldiers and sailors who helped them escape, and toward the American people who welcomed the with open arms.

“During our first days in the States, my family had to adjust to new faces, culture, and language, but I knew deep down this great country offered something that Vietnam could not, and that was freedom,” says Kenny’s father, Truong Nhu Dinh. “We speak for most Vietnamese-Americans when we say we are appreciative for everything the Americans have done for us, especially the soldiers and their families for making the ultimate sacrifices. We owe this country our gratitude and know it will be impossible to repay America.”

Here in the United States, hurt and bitterness remain due to the misunderstanding of what happened in Vietnam and misconceptions about the feelings of the South Vietnamese people. Many people still believe that the South Vietnamese didn’t want us there and didn’t help defend their country. The Truong family wants people to know the truth.

“The elders and babies were carried piggyback by U.S. soldiers,” says Kenny’s mother, Nga Truong-Nhu. “A young soldier held my hand to help me walk to shore. American soldiers also carried heavy bags for Vietnamese refugees. I was moved to tears by the help from Americans I’d never met before.”

It is the family’s fervent hope that their message will help to heal old wounds that have festered in the minds and memories of unappreciated servicemen, many of whom gave their lives, both literally and figuratively, to the war. They want to share their story with the world and let them know how their American dream came true.

“America helped strengthen our family values,” says Nga Truong-Nhu. “Freedom has eased the pain I felt during the Vietnam War. My children have better lives in America. Freedom and independence are priceless.”

For a review copy of the book or to set up an interview with one of the authors, please contact Sarah Van Blaricum at 727-443-7115, ext. 207

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: